innovator

Add idea


Calendar

«    November 2018    »
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
 

 

Advert

 

Payment

 

Advert

 

Authorization

Стартап

DateDate: 9-11-2018, 06:07

 Personal non-property and property rights for the invention belong to the author and protected under current legislation. 
 The idea is that regular ice cream, which we eat almost every day, put in the spray can.
 In fact, the idea of creating a spray of ice cream is associated with the simplification of its use, especially by children. Children are not dirty, using it foamy and the taste and color scheme has a large number of options. A can of spray-ice cream is very convenient to store in the refrigerator and used outside of refrigerator also increases. The amount can vary from as very little as for use at home, and much more for use in industrial scale ( restaurants and cafes, confectionery, festive events ). The pressure in this very spray a little more than usual these cans to frozen consistency could be extruded from the container, designed to spray ice cream.
 The idea is open for investment and complete its foreclosure.
 +380505238948

DateDate: 9-11-2018, 06:00

Scientists have activated the world's largest “brain”: a supercomputer with millions of processing cores and 1,200 interconnected motherboards that work together like a human brain.
Ten years in development, this is the world's largest neuromorphic computer - a type of computer that mimics the neurons themselves and their connection, - scientists announced on November 2.
The duplicated neural network architecture, or SpiNNaker, is a computer system located at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, and it "rethinks conventional computers," said project member Steve Furber, a professor of computer engineering at the University of Manchester. But SpiNNaker doesn't just “think” like a brain. According to the statement, it creates models of neurons in the human brain, and it simulates more neurons in real time than any other computer on Earth.
Since April 2016, SpiNNaker has been modeling neuron activity using 500,000 main processors, but the upgraded machine has twice the capacity, Furber explained. With the support of the European Union's Human Brain Project - efforts to create a virtual human brain - SpiNNaker will continue to provide scientists with the opportunity to create detailed brain models. But now he is capable of simultaneously performing 200 quadrillion actions, according to university representatives.
While some other computers may compete with SpiNNaker in the number of processors they contain, what distinguishes this platform is the infrastructure connecting these processors. In the human brain, 100 billion neurons simultaneously transmit signals to thousands of destinations. The SpiNNaker architecture supports an exceptional level of communication between processors, which behaves like a brain's neural network, explains Furber.
Previously, when SpiNNaker worked with only 500,000 processors, it modeled 80,000 neurons in the cerebral cortex, which control data from the senses. According to SpiNNaker, a Parkinson-affected brain zone hints at the potential of a computer as a tool for studying brain disorders. SpiNNaker can also control a mobile robot called SpOmnibot, which uses a computer to interpret data from the robot's vision sensors and makes the choice of real-time navigation.
With all of its computational power and brain power, how close does SpiNNaker behave like a real human brain? So far, it is simply impossible to imitate the human brain exactly, said Furber. An advanced machine such as the SpiNNaker can still manage only a small amount of information received by the human brain, and supercomputers have a long way to go before they can think for themselves, Furber writes in a letter. “Even with millions of processors, we can approach only 1% of the scale of the human brain, and this is a big simplification of assumptions,” he said. However, SpiNNaker can mimic the brain function of a mouse, which is 1,000 times smaller than the human brain, Furber added.