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DateDate: 14-05-2017, 06:19
The so-called "octobot", described at the end of August in the journal "Nature", the first of its kind. The bot looks like a transparent octopus. In the future, this baby will be able to move your body and diagnose various diseases.
It is reported science-interest.ru.
New development refutes the conventional idea of the robot as hard on the car, which happen oil leakage and short circuit, which creates serious limitations when it comes to interaction with real biological systems. To interact with soft and delicate body engineers came up with some impressive solutions (e.g. – fish-robot), which still suffer from some limitations related to the presence of rigid robotic control systems and power sources.
"Still it was a hybrid solution," reports Robert wood, the Creator of the robotics laboratory at Harvard and a leading member of the team octobot.
As a rule, soft work moving by change of pressure. Such a mechanism can be represented in the form of small connected chambers. When you need to make the movement of the camera due to the pneumatic effect produced it. The range of available movements and States for this technology are almost limitless. That is, they are limitless within power supply and control system. Soft works requires a source of pressure that makes it hard.
Octobot operates on the same principle, but as the source pressure is used, a chemical fuel that releases large amounts of energy in the form of hot gases.
In the center of "octopus" is located mqrilyn system, where instead of the usual logic circuits are the valves which regulate the pressure in certain limbs.
Octobot demonstrates the minimum functionality of the system created using this approach. To teach the robot to perform more complex tasks, you need to include logic and additional materials.
In other words, a new robot – proof scientific concepts and seeds for thought. The development of such devices can affect the medical, security and various industrial enterprises. Read more here: http://zik.ua/news/2017/05/14/doslidnyky_z_garvardskogo_universytetu_rozrobyly_myakogo_robota_1095647


DateDate: 14-05-2017, 06:17

Wearing augmented reality glasses, the surgeon will see a virtual 3D-map of internal organs of the patient when he lies on the operating table
Augmented reality technology may soon "come" in medicine
Augmented reality technology may soon "come" in medicine
The developed augmented reality system uses magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to create 3D images. Thus, the surgeon, wearing special glasses see the virtual organs directly into the patient's body, – the "Popular Mechanics".
Augmented reality technology may soon "come" in medicine by surgeons will be able to see the internal organs of the patient without the need to make cuts.
Wearing augmented reality glasses, the surgeon will see a virtual 3D-map of internal organs of the patient when he lies on the operating table. The system has been tested on a surgical dummy, using previously recovered data.
Surgeons will also be able to make notes directly on the virtual bodies that they should be easier to control the process operation, says Simon Karger, head of technology development at Cambridge Consultants in Boston, USA. In addition, the doctor will be able, for example, "select" (a virtual marker) nerve, which should be avoided in surgical intervention, or "mark" which organ needs to be removed.
The augmented reality system, which was developed by Karger, uses magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to create 3D images of internal organs of the patient. The resulting image is passed on AT the mixed reality headset, Microsoft HoloLens. Thus, the surgeon, wearing glasses, sees a virtual 3D-organs directly into the patient's body.
In the future, the developers plan to expand the functionality: for example, you can enable feedback in the online mode to help less experienced surgeons during complex operations.
Karger admits that his technology is still in its early stages, and test it on real patients can only be in a few years. "The image must be very precise so that it could not cause surgical error," — emphasizes the researcher.