innovator

Add idea


Calendar

«    September 2019    »
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
 

 

Advert

 

Payment

 

Advert

 

Authorization

Стартап

DateDate: 23-09-2019, 05:54

Along with an increase in the number of optical pulses, new crystals increase their power.
Physicists have long developed special optical resonators capable of converting laser light into ultrashort pulses moving around the circumference of these resonators. Moreover, these pulses, called "dissipative Kerr solitons", can "multiply" inside the resonator, the shape of which determines the shape and other parameters of the light pulses.
When solitons leave the limits of the resonator, they form a series of pulses repeating at stable time intervals, and the smaller the diameter of the resonator, the shorter the pulse repetition time interval, which can go into the range of hundreds of gigahertz. This technology can be used in the future to increase the efficiency and quality of optical communication lines, or become the basis for new ultra-high-speed LiDAR optical scanners that provide submicron accuracy.
 
Unfortunately, when trying to further reduce the diameter of the ring resonator, scientists were faced with the well-known phenomenon of increasing light losses, overcoming steep bends in its path. This problem is very well known in fiber optics, and in this case it determines that the sizes of microresonators cannot be less than several tens of microns, which, in turn, limits the maximum frequency of repetition of light pulses.
Not so long ago, a group of physicists from the Swiss Federal Polytechnic University of Lausanne (Swiss Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL) found a way around the limitation described above, completely "decoupling" the pulse repetition rate from the size of the microresonator. In the resonator created by them, the maximum possible number of Kerr solitons arises and the exact interval between them is observed. This method of controlling light can be considered an optical analogue of atomic chains in crystalline solids, and, thus, this resonator is called the "perfect soliton crystal" (perfect soliton crystals, PSC).
One of the remarkable properties of such soliton crystals is that along with an increase in the number of optical pulses, these crystals also increase their power, i.e. the amount of energy enclosed in them.
"The technology developed by us allows us to obtain a series of optical pulses with a very high repetition rate, which can reach several terahertz, while it uses fairly ordinary optical ring microresonators," the researchers write, "all this can be used in spectroscopic technologies, in technologies measuring distances and as a source of radiation in the terahertz range having a very low level of intrinsic noise. "