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DateDate: 3-10-2019, 05:48
Scientists investigated fluid mechanics to create a squid-like robot — fast, quiet, and inconspicuous.
Inspired by the unique and effective swimming strategy of cephalopods, scientists have developed a water robot that mimics the shape of their movement. This is written in the work of Physics of fluids.
These squid-like high-speed robots are made from smart materials that make them difficult to detect — an advantage that could potentially be used for military intelligence and scientific applications — while maintaining low environmental impact.
Physicists Xiaobo Bi and Qiang Zhu used numerical simulations to illustrate the physical mechanisms and mechanics of a fluid in a squid swimming technique that uses intermittent pulses through pulsed reactive motion. Using this form of movement, the new device can achieve impressive speeds, like squids.
During swimming, these squid-like machines suck water into the pressure chamber and then push it out. A soft-body device can be used as a platform for environmental monitoring, while simultaneously using this function to test water samples while swimming.
 
"In addition to the two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical modeling presented in this article, we are working with an interdisciplinary team to create a prototype of a mechanical device for swimming and direct maneuvers. This project will combine dynamics, control, intelligent materials and robotic design," says Qiang Zhu, physicist and creator of the robot.
The device can be used as a freestanding swimmer or propeller of an underwater vehicle. Researchers with the prototype made have not yet been able to maintain speeds that can last more than a few cycles due to turbulence and instability, but they are working on ways to overcome this. Zhu hopes that this experience will serve as a starting point for more complex models and experimental research to develop such robots.