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Стартап
DateDate: 18-04-2019, 05:53

A scientist from the Rochester Institute of Technology and experts from the University of Rochester have teamed up to create a laser based on sound using optical tweezers developed by the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics, Arthur Eshkin.
In a Nature Photonics journal article, researchers describe a phonon laser using an optically levitated nanoparticle. Phonon is a quantum of energy associated with a sound wave. Using optical tweezers, one can test the limits of quantum effects in isolation and eliminate physical disturbances from the environment. Scientists have studied the mechanical vibrations of a nanoparticle lifted into the air by the power of an optical laser beam.
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“Measuring the position of a nanoparticle by registering the light it scatters and sending this information back to the beam of tweezers allows us to create a laser-like situation,” says Mishkat Bhattacharya from the Rochester Institute of Technology. “Mechanical vibrations become intense and perfectly synchronized — just like electromagnetic waves coming from the optical laser. "
Since the waves emanating from the laser pointer are synchronous, the beam can travel long distances without being scattered in all directions, unlike the light of the Sun or a light bulb. In a standard optical laser, the properties of the light flux are controlled by the material from which the laser is made. It is interesting that in the phonon laser the roles of light and matter are opposite: the motion of a material particle is governed by optical feedback.
"We are very excited about what applications this device may have - especially with regard to sensing and information processing, given that the optical laser has many applications and continues to evolve," said Bhattacharya.
He also noted that the phonon laser promises to help in research in the field of fundamental physics, including the development of the famous mental experiment "Schrödinger's cat", which can exist in two states at the same time.
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During the study, Bhattacharya collaborated with a group led by Nick Vamivakas from the Institute of Optics of the University of Rochester. The theoretical team Bhattacharya, who worked on the article, also included Venchao Ge and Pardip Kumar. Vamyvakas, in turn, supervised the work of the graduate students of the University of Rochester, Robert Pettit and Danika Lunz-Martin, the former graduate student Levi Neukirch, and the candidate of sciences Justin Schulz.





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